background image

Sysmic Robotics 2023 Team Description Paper

Tom´

as Rodenas, Daniel Torres, Pablo Reyes, Javiera Pe˜

na, Claudio Tapia, and

Daniela Moya

Universidad T´

ecnica Federico Santa Mar´ıa, Av. Espa˜

na 1680, Valpara´ıso, Chile

Abstract.

This paper briefly describes what the team has developed for

the third generation of mobile robots, particularly the changes made since
2020 so far. The team’s approach this year was to optimize the kicker
system, restructure the design of the robot’s prototype, the creation of a
new client, changes in the wheels’s mechanics and finally a new version of
the data package sent to each robot. The topics involving our work, such
as electrical, mechanics, software and firmware, were designed according
to satisfy the Robocup rules.

Keywords:

Robocup

·

Small Size League

·

Mobile robots

1

Introduction

Sysmic, is a team of students from the Technical University Federico Santa
Mar´ıa. The team first attended the Small Size League (SSL) in 2018 in Mon-
treal by the name of AIS, obtaining a sixth place in Division B. The team
stood partially inactive between 2020 and 2021 due to pandemics, and now in-
tends to participate in the RoboCup 2023, Bordeaux. In this regard, there have
been no significant changes to our mechanical and electrical design, other than
those discussed in the following paragraph. The inability to work actively during
2020/21 slowed down the pace of work prior to the quarantines, and therefore
we have maintained the vast majority of our designs until 2020 [5]. On the other
hand, most of these changes come from our developments presented for the 2019
RoboCup [8], which we were not able to test in a competitive environment, and
therefore we did not see the need to modify them substantially until we tested
them in competition. Nevertheless, the following section summarises our TDP
and the changes we have made from our previous design, as well as some of the
ongoing developments we have in the software area.

In section 2, we briefly present the mechanical design of our robots and the

modifications we have made to the drive train, moving to a gearless system
because the torque characteristics of our motors are adequate for this operation,
which provides us with a significant reduction of the space that was occupied by
the gear system and has a direct influence on the cost of manufacture. Section
3 presents the changes made to the hardware of the robots, specifically a new
kicking system that allows to charge the associated capacitors 6x times faster
than our previous design. Section 4 addresses the changes made in the software
area, presenting the current development of a new graphical user interface (GUI)

pdftohtml_folder/2023_TDP_Sysmic_Robotics-html.html
background image

2

T. Rodenas et al.

Fig. 1: General structure of our robot.

for our client, as well as modifications in the communication packages between
it and the robots.

2

Mechanics

2.1

Summary of structural design

The current version of our robot generally has the same structure as our de-
sign submitted in our RoboCup 2020 application [5]. The main features of our
mechanical design are:

Structure composed of parts printed in PLA filament joined by two 3 [mm]
thick Alucobond discs.

Height of 13.5 [cm] and a diameter of 18 [cm].

Upper case made of lightweight material, currently cardboard and potentially
fiberglass.

The external part of the wheels are 3D printed. One iteration of our design
considered machining aluminum, but that was too expensive for our budget.

Figure 1 shows the design of our robot presented in our 2020 TDP. For more

details of the transition from previous designs refer to the cited paper.

Another highlight of our current design is the dribbler. Inspired the Tigers

Mannheim 2018 ETDP [6], we proposed a mobile design that solves the problem

pdftohtml_folder/2023_TDP_Sysmic_Robotics-html.html
background image

Sysmic Robotics 2023 Team Description Paper

3

Fig. 2: Dribbler design.

of null damping (see Fig. 2). The structure of the dribbler is made of plastic
additive manufacturing (PLA with an FDM 3D printer), with two brass pulleys
and an O’ring that transmit the motion from the motor to the roller. On the
sides are oval silicone rings that allow movement between the part that holds
the roller and the motor, with the support to the robot. The roller is placed at
a height of 38 [mm] above the ground, with a diameter of 11 [mm], which means
that the coverage of the ball does not exceed 13% of the surface of the ball when
viewed from above.

2.2

Drivetrain modification

For this new version, a coupling was designed so that the wheel and the motor
were directly connected, creating a single wheel lock system, this caused the
elimination of the previously used gear system. This change gave us a decrease
in the overall height of the robot by approximately 15 [mm] and a decrease in
its radius by 2 [mm]. These changes are inspired by the modifications the Tigers
Mannheim team made to its powertrain in the 2020 ETDP [7].

Production cost decreased because the coupling was taken from a 5/16” hex

bolt that was cut to the desired length and press-drilled into the motor. We no
longer need to spend on the creation and production of specific gears but rather
use already standardized bolts. According to the current prices of purchase and
import of gears to Chile, the change of the drive system represents a saving of
about

$

120.00 (USD) per robot.

Fig. shows our former drivetrain design, while Fig. presents the direct

motor to wheel connection.

3

Hardware

3.1

Kicker

This year we have improved our ball kicking system. The first version of the
kicker featured a relatively simple boost circuit that charged two 1200 [uF] ca-

pdftohtml_folder/2023_TDP_Sysmic_Robotics-html.html
background image

4

T. Rodenas et al.

Fig. 3: Former drivetrain design.

(a)

(b)

Fig. 4: New drivetrain with motor to wheel connection.

pacitors to 120V in about 6 seconds (see Fig. 5a). Given the requirements of the
competition, it was necessary to optimize the kicking system, opting to use a
high-voltage charge controller for capacitors with built-in regulation, for this we
choose the LT3751 integrated circuit (IC) [4]. This particular IC has been used
by other teams, such as “MRL Small Size Soccer team [2]” due its fast charging
capabilities and easy of integrate. This IC proved to be effective in charging two
1200 [uF] capacitors each at 220V in about 1 second. This led to the development
of a new 4 layer PCB with the LT3751 at its core (see Fig. 5b), however the
board design induced noise in the sources and generated random system reboots.
In this way, the current PCB board for the LT3751 IC was developed (see Fig.
for the current board design and Fig. for its schematic), with the following
characteristics:

pdftohtml_folder/2023_TDP_Sysmic_Robotics-html.html
background image

Sysmic Robotics 2023 Team Description Paper

5

(a)

(b)

Fig. 5: Former kicker boards. (a) was a simple boost used from 2015 to 2018. (b)
was the board used from 2019 to 2020, but generates noise on the system.

Fig. 6: New board developed in 2022 with improved features.

It incorporates bleeder resistor to lower the voltage level of the capacitors
and thus improve kick control.

Add more filter capacitors to improve voltage stability.

The relay actuator to deliver energy into kicker solenoid was changed for a
high current IGBT with isolated gate.

The new PCB include the option to test 2 different flyback transformers:
the DA2033-AL (5A max in primary coil) and the GA3459-BL (20A max
in primary coil). After corresponding tests, we choose to use GA3459-BL
because it is 4x times faster charging the capacitors, taking approximately
600 milliseconds.

The board incorporates multiple solder bridges to test different configuration
for the LT3751 IC, like connect FB pin to ground or to a voltage divider in
the high voltage side, different voltages for LVgate, different voltages for
clamp pin and the option to separate ground for high voltage side.

Fig. shows the kicker board mounted on the robot.

pdftohtml_folder/2023_TDP_Sysmic_Robotics-html.html