background image

STOx’s 2016 Extended Team Description Paper

Saith Rodr´ıguez, Eyberth Rojas, Kather´ın P´

erez, Carlos Quintero, Heyson

aez, Oswaldo Pe˜

na, and Juan Calder´

on

Faculty of Electronics Engineering

Universidad Santo Tom´

as

Bogot´

a, Colombia

{saithrodriguez,eyberthrojas,kathyperez,carlosquintero,

heysonbaez,oswaldopena,juancalderon}@stoxs.org

http://www.stoxs.org

Abstract.

This paper shows the current state of the STOx’s team after

its last participation in the latest RoboCup world championship. Among
the most important characteristics we see that STOx’s has achieved a
number of goals converted per game of 2

.

71, while only received 0

.

43

goals per game, the lowest compared to previous participations. Also,
we show two important tools developed and implemented in our team’s
software platform: one that allows us to identify and reconstruct the
parabolic path followed by the ball after a chip kick with an average
error of the estimated landing point of less than 6cm. The other tool is
used to calculate a set of key points to construct dynamic plays after an
indirect free kick. The developed algorithm provides locations that are
good candidates for receiving the pass and shoot to the goal with high
chances of scoring and is based on a constrained optimization problem.

1

Introduction

Our team has been participating in the RoboCup initiative since 2011 [1] with
its fifth participation in the latest RoboCup version in 2015 [2]. During the
experience lived in the RoboCup events, the relationships and talks with other
participants and the TDPs of the most experienced teams [3] have allowed us to
assemble a team that has grown and improved over time.

The evolution of the main technical aspects of the league has provided the

teams with the possibility to explore a large variety of new cooperative tech-
niques [4, 5], faster games [6], more dynamic plays and a highly attractive show
for the general audience and soccer fans. Specifically, the extension of the field
dimensions has given new room for the fast robot agents to perform more cre-
ative, free and dynamic games. The decisions in terms of accurately predicting
the behavior and actions of the most competitive teams have become also an
interesting and yet open challenge [7].

The robots have had little changes since the incorporation of the chip kickers,

more powerful traction motors of some teams and some customized modifications
that certain teams have added. However, new major changes that add function-
alities to the current state of the robots may be included in the near future in

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

2

Rodr´ıguez et.al

order to keep evolving the league. At the end of the day, the SSL is a chal-
lenge that pushes forward the state of the art, not only in the field of artificial
intelligence, but also in robotics.

In this paper, we start discussing the current state of the STOx’s team, specif-

ically by showing its overall performance in the latest RoboCup championship
and highlighting some of their most important characteristics. Afterwards, we
show the development of a technique that has allowed us to predict the trajec-
tory of the ball after it has been kicked by a chip kicker. Finally, we describe a
highly important framework used by our team in order to discover points with
high scoring chances and creating dynamic attack plays. In all sections we show
descriptions, simulations and results of our techniques.

2

Current state of the STOx’s team

With only its fifth participation in the RoboCup world championship, the STOx’s
team still a young team in the league and there are still large amounts of pos-
sibilities to improve the team’s technical abilities. Since we started our partici-
pation in 2011, every year, major changes were required to significantly increase
the team’s performance, especially in the robot’s electronics and mechanics [8,
9]. During these 5 years, we have designed and built 3 different generations of
robots that strive for more robust, accurate, fast and reliable agents; a key factor
in the development of a successful SSL team. After profound changes from one
year to the next in the robots we have finally achieved a state where only minor
changes and maintenance are required between consecutive tournaments. This is
a highly important state for young teams to start the creation and development
of more interesting and dynamic AI techniques.

For RoboCup 2016, the general mechanics and electronics of the robots will

remain the same as the last year. Only a minor set of modifications and mainte-
nance actions are currently being carried out. One that may be worth to mention
is the reinforcement and protection of the dribbler motors since many of them
ended broken after the last competition. For a more detailed view of our robot’s
main characteristics see [2, 8].

With a set of new dynamic attack plays and heavily reinforced defense strate-

gies we were able to achieve in RoboCup 2015 our best participation in a world
championship event: enter the top 4 teams in the league. The path to this achieve-
ment consisted on 7 official games: 3 in the round robin, 1 in lucky loser, 1 in
quarter finals, 1 in the semifinal and 1 for third place.

Table 1 shows a set of statistics extracted from the game logs in RoboCup

2015 that aims at describing the main STOx’s attributes in attacking and de-
fense.

The first thing to notice is the amount of goals received per played game

(0

.

43) which is the lowest in all of our participations in the RoboCup champi-

onships. The amount of converted goals, 19 and normalized by the number of
games 2

.

71 is also by far, the largest achieved by our team.

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

STOx’s 2016 ETDP

3

Table 1.

Matches statistics - STOx’s RoboCup 2015

G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7

Goals received

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

Goals saved by goalie

1

0

0

0

0

5

3

Goals saved by defenders 2

0

1

0

6

19

6

Intercepted passes

2

0

0

4

3

6

2

Goals converted

0

10

5

3

1

0

0

Shots attempted

7

7

2

8

9

1

2

Passes attempted

0

0

1

1

3

0

0

Table 2 and Table 3 show a summary of the attacking and defense most

important statistics during the championship. Our team’s conversion rate (35%)
shows how effective is our attack to convert a goal after we are able to shoot to
goal.

In the defense strategies, we count shots from the opponent that aimed at

our goal that were saved by our goalie or by our defenders. The first thing to
notice is the high amount of saved goals which shows a strong characteristic of
our team’s participation in RoboCup 2015: its strong defense. The goals saved by
the goalkeeper, although much less than those saved by the defenders, happened
on highly difficult games (G6 and G7) under very fast and closed plays.

Table 2.

Summary of the statistics for attacking strategies of the STOx’s team in

RoboCup 2015

Shots attempted

55

Goals converted

19

Shots missed or blocked 36

Conversion rate

35%

Table 3.

Summary of the statistics for defense strategies of the STOx’s team in

RoboCup 2015

Goals saved

40

By Goalie

9

By Defenders

31

Blocking rate

93%

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

4

Rodr´ıguez et.al

3

Latest hardware modification

The 3

rd

generation of the STOx’s team comprises a set of 12 robots equipped

with all the necessary features to make them competitive and robust. Little
modifications have been made to the current generation from 2015 to 2016 in
electronics and mechanics and the full specification of all the systems are ex-
plained in detail in [8]. In particular, two modifications were made, namely:

We have changed the location of the IR ball sensor in order to increase the
certainty of the ball’s possesion and to reduce the time required for the robot
to detect the ball, i.e., if the sensor is located too low with respect to the
ball’s center, it will take longer to detect the ball when entering the dribbler.

We have added a special protection for the dribbler motors. In our original
design, the dribbler motors were exposed and usually receive collisions with
other robots during the games causing damages to the planetary gearboxes
of the motors. We have added a metal cover to protect the motors from
further damages.

4

Automatic identification and reconstruction of a chip
kick

Since 2005, many of the teams participating in the SSL adopted a kicking device
for their robots that added one new capability; that of making passes and shots
to the goal by lifting the ball from the ground. With these chip kickers the
teams did not require to find a clear path to perform a pass or shoot to goal,
widening the game possibilities and hence making it hard for the opponents to
block these passes or potential goals. Furthermore, the vision system of the SSL
creates a mapping from a 3D real world to a virtual world made out of, mainly,
2D positions and velocities, making the chip kicks even more difficult to detect.

Today’s gameplay in the SSL is even faster, more dynamic and more intel-

ligent and the chip kicks are a natural and fundamental piece of this elegant
game. Modern AI strategies of the participating teams require fast computation
and prediction of the opponent team’s behavior in order to take appropriate
actions. This accurate prediction is a key factor in many of the current team’s
sophisticated AI techniques[5, 7].

Concretely, the accurate prediction of the landing point of the ball after a

chip kick is a very important task, for both, defending and attacking plays. It
could be used to decide whether a defender should release a mark or not or if
the goalkeeper should try to block a shoot or not. Also, if the prediction is not
correctly calculated, the pass of a team mate may fail, leaving the control of the
ball in the opponent’s possession. A dangerous pass of the opponent team may
not be correctly blocked or a defender robot may not have enough time to block
an opponent’s pass.

In all cases, this prediction should be made as fast as possible since it may

be useless if the ball already finished its trajectory. The following sections show
our approach to accurately identify and predict a chip kick as fast as possible.

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

STOx’s 2016 ETDP

5

4.1

Identification of a parabolic flight

The identification of a chip kick or parabolic flight when using one camera (or set
of cameras) in general position may be not straightforward. From the system’s
perspective, the ball has only a two-dimensional position in each frame with no
clue of its elevation with respect to the ground, whatsoever.

A simple observation yields to the conclusion that the apparent ball trajec-

tory (i.e., the one detected by the camera) when there is a chip kick looks in the
vision system as a curve path. However, the noise in the vision system and the
amount of possible curves that exist when chipping from different places in the
field to other different locations make it hard to come up with a simple thumb
rule for detecting whether the given shoot was a chip kick or not. Fig. 1 shows
a representation of how a chip kick looks in the vision system and the real path
the ball follows.

Fig. 1.

Representation of the projected path followed by the ball in a chip kick, how

the real parabolic path may look like and the actual and estimated ball’s landing points

The first step is to identify the approximate moment when the robot kicked

the ball. This is easy achievable by tracking the derivative of the ball’s velocity
from frame to frame. When the magnitude of the velocity’s derivative shows a
peak, then a new shot has been kicked. In other words, we start counting a shot
when the velocity of the ball suddenly increases. Fig. 2 shows the velocity profile
of a ball that has just been kicked.

We have implemented a simple learning machine capable of identifying whether

a given set of frames, corresponding to a new shot is a parabolic flight or not
based on previous examples. We need first to extract a set of features for each

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

6

Rodr´ıguez et.al

Fig. 2.

Typical ball’s velocity profile after it has been kicked

new shot with the information required to identify a chip kick from a different
type of kick. Based on this, we used for each kick, the nine angles formed between
its first ten consecutive apparent ball positions, as features to predict whether
it is a parabolic flight or not. These angles look like those in Fig. 3

Fig. 3.

Angles between ten consecutive apparent ball positions in a parabolic shot

According to the figure, each shoot is represented as a 9–dimensional vector,

i.e.,

x

i

R

9

. We have collected data from the RoboCup 2015 game logs and

manually labeled each shot in the logs as chip kick or not chip kick, obtaining 270
chip kicks and 300 not chip kicks. This dataset is then divided into two disjoint
sets namely the training set and the testing set to perform cross validation: this
is, the training process used to build the classifier is performed using only the
data in the training set whereas the data in the testing set is only used to assess
the generalization capability of the classifier, i.e., its classification performance
on new data.

For this task, we have selected a support vector machine (SVM) binary clas-

sifier with gaussian kernel. SVMs are recognized to be very powerful learning
machines for general problems capable of finding highly complex non-linear clas-
sification boundaries [10]. The idea behind SVMs consists on finding a hyper-
plane that separates instances of two different classes with maximum distance

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

STOx’s 2016 ETDP

7

between the hyperplane and the closest training data point. More formally, the
SVM algorithm solves the following optimization problem:

arg min

w,ζ,b

1

2

k

w

k

2

+

C

n

X

i

=1

ζ

i

(1)

subject to

y

i

(

wx

i

b

)

1

ζ

i

, where

ζ

i

>

0

i

= 1

, . . . n

are slack variables,

w

is the vector that defines the classification surface and

C

is a regularization

parameter that avoids overfitting to the training data.

The nonlinear capabilities of the SVMs come from the kernel trick [10]. The

idea is to find a new representation of the original data into a new space where a
hyperplane suffices to separate the new transformed data. This transformation
is usually achieved through a special function known as the kernel without the
need to explicitly mapping the data. The gaussian kernel is one of the most
general and widely used kernel functions:

k

(

x

i

, x

j

) = exp(

γ

k

x

i

x

j

k

2

) for

γ >

0

(2)

The process of cross validation previously described is useful also to select

the parameters involved in the learning procedure of a learning machine, namely
the value of the regularization parameter

C

and the value of the kernel param-

eter

γ

. The general procedure consists on performing a grid search in the space

of the parameters and perform the training using a specific combination of the
parameters. Each combination of the parameters is valued according to its per-
formance on the testing set to finally select the combination that yields to the
lowest generalization error.

We have trained a SVM with the characteristics described above using the

LibSVM library [11] and attained 97

.

4% of accuracy in the testing set which

allows us to automatically identify whether a new shot during a game is a chip
kick or not after its 10 initial frames. After trained, our classifier can be easily
plugged into our AI software to identify whether a given shoot is a chip kick or
not using only the support vectors.

4.2

Reconstruction of the parabolic path

The reconstruction of the parabolic path of the ball when kicked by a robot
using its chip kicker by using only a few initial observations is the final task to
solve.

For this task, we have implemented a method based on [12] that uses the 3

initial frames to directly reconstruct the parabolic path of the ball by solving
a system of linear equations. The first step consists on transforming the coor-
dinates of an object captured by the camera (camera coordinates) to the world
coordinates by using the rotation matrix

R

and the translation vector

l

. If the

point where the parabolic flight starts is (

x

0

, y

0

, z

0

) and the velocity of the ball

during its trajectory is

v

= (

v

x

, v

y

, v

z

), then, the camera’s coordinates of the

path is:

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

8

Rodr´ıguez et.al

(

x, y, z

) =

x

0

+

v

x

t

+

1

2

g

x

t

2

, y

0

+

v

y

t

+

1

2

g

y

t

2

, z

0

+

v

z

t

+

1

2

g

z

t

2

(3)

where

t

is the time since the shoot started and (

g

x

, g

y

, g

z

) are the components of

the earth gravity, which must be transformed into the camera coordinates using
the rotation matrix

R

. For details, see [12].

If

m

points (

x

i

, y

i

, z

i

)

,

i

= 1

,

2

, ..., m

are taken at times

t

i

,

i

= 1

,

2

, ..., m

respectively, then, the projection of the position of the ball in the image plane
of the camera is:

x

0

i

z

0

i

,

y

0

i

z

0

i

=

x

0

+

v

x

t

i

+

1
2

g

x

t

2

i

z

0

+

v

z

t

i

+

1
2

g

z

t

2

i

,

y

0

+

v

y

t

i

+

1
2

g

y

t

2

i

z

0

+

v

z

t

i

+

1
2

g

z

t

2

i

(4)

If

α

i

=

x

0

i

z

0

i

and

β

i

=

y

0

i

z

0

i

, then:

α

i

=

x

0

+

v

x

t

i

+

1
2

g

x

t

2

i

z

0

+

v

z

t

i

+

1
2

g

z

t

2

i

α

i

z

0

+

α

i

v

z

t

i

+

α

i

1

2

g

z

t

2

i

=

x

0

+

v

x

t

i

+

1

2

g

x

t

2

i

α

i

z

0

+

α

i

v

z

t

i

x

0

v

x

t

i

=

1

2

g

z

α

i

t

2

i

+

1

2

g

x

t

2

i

(5)

β

i

=

y

0

+

v

y

t

i

+

1
2

g

y

t

2

i

z

0

+

v

z

t

i

+

1
2

g

z

t

2

i

β

i

z

0

+

β

i

v

z

t

i

+

β

i

1

2

g

z

t

2

i

=

y

0

+

v

y

t

i

+

1

2

g

y

t

2

i

β

i

z

0

+

β

i

v

z

t

i

y

0

v

y

t

i

=

1

2

g

z

β

i

t

2

i

+

1

2

g

y

t

2

i

(6)

(5) and (6) form two equations with six variables. At least 4 more equations

are required to find a solution for the 6

th

order linear equation system, requiring

at least 2 more samples for a total of 3. However, due to noise in the vision system,
the more samples are included in the estimation of the parabolic flight, the higher
the accuracy of the reconstruction. We have implemented this technique on 60
different chip kicks made from different locations in the field.

Fig. 4 shows the reconstructed parabolic paths computed by the algorithm

using 3

,

4

, ...,

60 samples. It is possible to confirm that the reconstructed paths

that use more samples are closer to the actual parabolic flight than those that
use less.

Also, Fig. 5 shows the average error of the estimated final point for all 60 kicks

for a different number of samples used to reconstruct each path. The average
error decreases as expected and shows that it is already fairly low for more than
10 samples.

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

STOx’s 2016 ETDP

9

Fig. 4.

Reconstructed parabolic flights computed by the algorithm using a different

amount of samples

Fig. 5.

Average error of the estimated final point for all 60 kicks for a different number

of samples used to reconstruct the parabolic paths.

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

10

Rodr´ıguez et.al

These results show that we can successfully identify and reconstruct the

parabolic flight of a ball kicked by a robot during a game using no more than
10 samples. First, a new shoot is detected by monitoring sudden changes in the
ball’s velocity. At that moment, we compute the angles between the first 10 ball
positions and use such information to detect whether the shoot was a chip kick
or not. If the answer is yes, we use such 10 stored positions to reconstruct the
parabolic flight and predict the landing point. Fig. 6 shows three scenarios of
such predictions, after the ball has been kicked in real games, implemented in
the STOx’s software environment.

Fig. 6(a), Fig. 6(d) and Fig. 6(g) show the initial setup just before the servic-

ing robot kicks the ball. Then, in Fig. 6(b), Fig. 6(e) and Fig. 6(h) it is possible
to see the ball trajectory a few frames after it has been kicked together with
the predicted landing point (red cross). In these figures, at least 10 frames has
passed and hence the reconstruction is already done. It is also possible to clearly
see the difference in the curvature paths captured by the vision system depend-
ing on the direction and location of the chip kick with respect to the camera
position. Finally, Fig. 6(c), Fig. 6(f) and Fig. 6(i) show the ball close to fall near
the predicted landing point.

5

Calculation of key points for the construction of
dynamic plays

Our team, together with the league, has been evolving from simple predefined set
plays to more complicated, dynamic and harder to predict plays when attacking.
In this section, we will show fundamental advances in our team’s AI that aims
at providing our robots with a more intelligent gameplay by calculating a set of
locations within the field where our robots might get high chances of scoring a
goal. In this work we only show examples of this calculation for creating plays
that follow a free kick. However, the concept can be seamlessly used in situations
of free game.

5.1

Defining an objective

Given the current state of our robots and their capabilities, we have defined
“good locations” for making a pass, when a free kick has been issued, as locations
in the field where a clear pass can be achieved, free of opponents marks, close to
the opponent’s goal, with clear shot to goal and hard to predict for the opponents.
In this scenario, we are considering that the robot receiving the pass will shoot
at goal immediately with high chances of success.

In our general setup, we assume that a kickoff has been issued. Then, one

robot prepares to make a pass and the remaining attackers will be positioned in
different field locations to create diversion. The pass is made to only one of the
attackers who will receive the ball and shoot at goal. Under this scenario, the
most important design issues for us are:

That the robot that receives the pass can shoot right away, without turning

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

STOx’s 2016 ETDP

11

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

(h)

(i)

Fig. 6.

a) Field setup before kicking a chip kick for scenario 1. b)Projection of the ball

after it has been kicked and prediction of the landing point (red cross) for scenario 1.
c) The ball almost finishing its parabolic path and getting close to the predicted point
for scenario 1. d) Field setup before kicking a chip kick for scenario 2. e)Projection
of the ball after it has been kicked and prediction of the landing point (red cross)
for scenario 2. f) The ball almost finishing its parabolic path and getting close to the
predicted point for scenario 2. g) Field setup before kicking a chip kick for scenario 3.
h)Projection of the ball after it has been kicked and prediction of the landing point
(red cross) for scenario 3. i) The ball almost finishing its parabolic path and getting
close to the predicted point for scenario 3.

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

12

Rodr´ıguez et.al

That the robot that receives the pass is close enough to the opponent’s goal

We have modeled this scenario as the following optimization problem:

arg min

(

x,y

)

w

1

θ

s

(

x, y

) +

w

2

d

g

(

x, y

)

(7)

where

θ

s

(

x, y

) is the angle in the location (

x, y

) between the direction where the

pass is coming and the direction of the opponent’s goal,

d

g

(

x, y

) is the distance

from the (

x, y

) location to the goal and

w

1

,

w

2

are weights that need to be tuned.

The idea is to find a location (

x, y

) with smallest weighted sum between distance

to goal and shot angle.

5.2

Constraints and simplifications

For the solution of the optimization problem (7) we have included a set of con-
straints and simplifications that allow us to find an improved solution that fulfills
all the conditions for a “good location” and that can still be solved in short time.
The following are the steps taken to further simplify the problem at hand:

– Create a coarse grid of the field:

We have created a coarse grid of the

game field in order to consider only a finite set of possible solutions to the
problem. The granularity of the grid controls the complexity of the solution
to the optimization problem and may vary according to the computational
power capabilities. For larger granularities of the grid we would get larger
solution times.

– Discard locations with the presence of opponents within a given

radius:

This constrain guarantees that the selected locations will be free of

opponents and furthermore that it will take a while for nearby opponents to
reach such locations.

– Discard locations that are too close to the ball:

In general, it is a good

idea to take the opponent unaware and especially unprepared. By including
this constraint we are motivating solutions that include fairly long passes
with the hope that the opponent will be as unprepared as possible

– Discard locations with

θ

s

(

x, y

)

> π/

4

:

Although the objective function

already encourages solutions with small values of

θ

s

(

x, y

), we have concluded

experimentally that shots to goal after a direct pass (without the robot
receiving the ball and turning) are possible up to a value of

θ

s

(

x, y

) smaller

than

π/

4

– Discard locations inside the opponent’s penalty area:

Our attackers

can not go inside the opponent’s goal area and thus these locations must be
excluded.

The procedure described above is performed when a new free indirect kick

is issued. After that, the optimization procedure returns as result the location
(

x, y

) with minimum value of the objective function. Nevertheless, in practice,

we do not only retrieve this optimum value, but we also find a set of (

x

i

, y

i

)

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

STOx’s 2016 ETDP

13

locations that fulfill all the constraints and that are organized by their value of
the objective function. From this set of “good locations” we finally choose 1, 2
or 3 to locate our attackers depending on the amount of available attackers for
the play. The pass will be performed to one of these robots standing on these
optimized locations.

5.3

Finding a location with high chances of scoring

The final step in the creation of these dynamic plays is the decision about which
of the attackers will receive the pass. For this, we have created a model that
allows us to discriminate among a set of “good locations”, the one with highest
chances of scoring. The idea is to quantify the scoring chance of a robot located
at point (

x, y

), according to the position of the goalkeeper.

The idea for this quantification process is quite simple: find the area un-

covered by the goalkeeper by projecting all possible shot directions from the
attacking robot to the goal line.

This quantification process will exclusively depend on the position of the

attacking robot and the position of the opponent’s goalkeeper, an attribute that
had not been taken into account in the optimization problem. Even though this
final criteria does not take into account the distance between attacker and goal
line, we can safely guarantee that the selected point will be close enough to the
goal line since this is one of the criteria of the optimization problem (7).

5.4

Example and results

After careful tuning of the parameters related to the whole process we were able
to implement our procedure for servicing free kicks in real games. Fig. 7 show
an example of a sequence where the described strategy is implemented and how
does it look in our STOx’s software framework.

Fig. 7(a) shows the initial setup for servicing an indirect free kick where

STOx’s is the yellow team. Fig. 7(b) shows the locations with lower values of
the objective function (7) after the optimization procedure is performed. These
locations also fulfill all constraints and simplification described above. In Fig.
7(c), only a subset of these locations are selected and the three attacking robots
are sent, one to each location (Fig. 7(d)). The evaluation step is performed and
the pass is made to robot number 4 (Fig. 7(e)) who finally is capable of shooting
to goal (Fig. 7(f)).

6

Conclusions

In this paper we have shown two important techniques in the STOx’s team
software development. On one hand, the reconstruction of the parabolic flight
has shown to have an error of less than 6

cm

when predicting the landing point of

the ball after a chip kick. We have also developed a learning machine with 97%
of generalization accuracy capable of recognizing whether a given shot is a chip

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

14

Rodr´ıguez et.al

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

Fig. 7.

a) Initial setup for servicing a free kick for the STOx’s team. b) Locations

found by the described algorithm are shown in white circles on the field. c) Three
selected locations shown in red circles to send the three available attackers. d) The
three attackers has been placed in to the three selected locations. e) The pass is made
to the attacker with higher scoring chance. f) The attacker receives the pass and shoots
at goal, finally scoring.

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html
background image

STOx’s 2016 ETDP

15

Fig. 8.

Picture of STOx’s team members in RoboCup 2015

kick or not. We have shown 3 examples from real games where this technique
successfully predicts the parabolic flights of the ball in different locations and
orientations in the field. On the other hand, we have shown a procedure to find
locations in the field with high chances of scoring after an indirect free kick has
been issued. The technique is based on a constrained optimization problem with
specific simplifications that has shown to be effective in a real game.

References

1. S. Rodr´ıguez and E. Rojas. Dise˜

no e implementaci´

on de un equipo Small Size League

para la RoboCup, Universidad Santo Tomas, 2010.

2. S. Rodr´ıguez, E. Rojas, K. P´

erez, J. L´

opez, C. Quintero, O. Pe˜

na, J. Giraldo and

J.M. Calder´

on. STOx’s 2015 Extended Team Description Paper. Hefei, China 2015.

Available for download in http://wiki.robocup.org/wiki/File:Small Size League -

RoboCup 2015 - ETDP STOx%E2%80%99s.pdf

3. T. Panyapiang, K. Chaiso, K. Sukvichai and P. Lertariyasakchai. Skuba 2012 Ex-

tended Team Description. Mexico D.F, Mexico 2012. Available for download in
http://robocupssl.cpe.ku.ac.th/ media/robocup2012:skuba etdp 2012.pdf

4. J.P. Mendoza, J. Biswas, P. Cooksey, R. Wang, S. Klee, D. Zhu, and M. Veloso.

Selectively reactive coordination for a team of robot soccer champions. In Proceed-
ings of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Conference
(AAAI), to appear 2016.

5. J.P. Mendoza, J. Biswas, D. Zhu, R. Wang, P. Cooksey, S. Klee, and M. Veloso.

CMDragons 2015: Coordinated offense and defense of the SSL champions. In Pro-
ceedings of the International RoboCup Symposium, to appear 2016.

6. S. Rodr´ıguez, E. Rojas, K. P´

erez, J. L´

opez, C. Quintero, J.M. Calder´

on. Fast Path

Planning Algorithm for the RoboCup Small Size League. In Chapter RoboCup 2014:

pdftohtml_folder/2016_ETDP_STOxs-html.html