background image

EMEnents 2013 Team Description

 

 

Arsalan Akhter

1,3

, Usama Tariq Butt

1

, Mahmood Azhar

2

, Syed Mohsin Raza

3

, Taimur 

Ahmad

3

, Ghina Zia

2

, M. Shahzad Bhatti

1

, Jahanzaib Sohail

2

, Muneeb Arshad

3

, Zain 

Imran

2

, Asif Mehmood

1

, Mesum Tamaar Malik

2

, Taousif Iqbal

2

, Abbas Amir

1

Muhamamad Salman

2

, Kunwar Faraz

3

, Shoab Khan

1

.

 

 

 

1

 Department of Computer Engineering,  

2

 Department of  Electrical Engineering,  

 

Department of Mechatronics Engineering 

 

NUST College of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering

 

National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan

 

robocupssl@ceme.nust.edu.pk

 

 

Abstract. 

This  paper  presents  an  overview  of  the  technical  details  of  team 

EMEnents,  the  Robocup  Small  Size  League  Team  from  NUST  College  of 
EME, Pakistan, for the year 2013. The paper discusses the current status of the 
team and the progress of the system developed so far. 

 

 

1    Introduction

 

 

Team EMEnents is an interdisciplinary team in its inception phase at NUST College 
of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, a constituent college of National University 
of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan. The vision for participation in Robocup Small 
Size  League  was  manifested  in  2009,  and  over  the  following  years,  the  team  has 
matured  itself  to  its  current  state,  where  it  now  intends  to  participate  in  Robocup 
2013. 
 
In  order  to  fulfill  the  requirements  of  the  project,  three  teams,  each  from  a  different 
department,  came  together  to  form  team  EMEnents.  Software  implementation  of  the 
game  play  and  planning  modules  of  the  project  were  implemented  by  the  team 
members  from  Computer  Engineering  and  Mechatronics  Engineering,  whereas  the 
Computer  Engineering  Team  also  implemented  the  software  side  of  wireless 
communication.  The  team  from  Electrical  Engineering  worked  on  boost  circuit 
implementation,  kicker  and  dribbler  circuitry.  The  team  from  Mechatronics 
Engineering took up the task of design & fabrication of the mechanical structure and 
relevant  electronic  circuitry  of  the  robot.  The  teams  from  Mechatronics  Engineering 
and Electrical Engineering worked together on electromechanical actuation of motors, 
wireless communication and feedback control.

 

 

We have been working with a three pronged strategy, namely, development of robots 
and hardware, development of software, integration & testing of individual modules, 
all  going  in  a  parallel  fashion.   The  paper discusses  the  current  system  in  detail  and 
casts  some  light  on  the  future  directions  in  which  the  system  is  intended  to  be 
developed.

 

 

pdftohtml_folder/2013_TDP_EMEnents-html.html
background image

2    Electronic Design

 

 

The Electronic Design Circuitry can be broadly classified into the following parts. 
  

2.1 BeagleBone 
 

The most important part of the robot hardware is its central processing  unit.  For our 
robots,  we  employed  a  relatively  newer  platform  known  as  the  BeagleBone  [1]. 
BeagleBone  is  an  ARM  Linux  based  platform  powered  by  AM3359  superscalar 
processor capable of clock speeds up to 720 Mhz. It has a number of general purpose 
input  output  (GPIO)  pins  for  interfacing  a  number  of  modules.  It  also  has  dedicated 
Enhanced  High  Resolution  Pulse  Width  Modulation  Channels  (EHRPWMs)  which 
make it ideal for controlling multiple motors.  The basic functions of the BeagleBone 
that we are using are: 
 

 

UART for Wireless Linkages 

 

Independent PWM channels: 4 for wheels, 1 for dribbler, 1 for boost circuit. 

 

Pin-outs for setting Motor directions 

 

Input capture modules for sensing motors encoders feedback 

 

Sensing feedback from IR sensor 

 

Support for  implementation of Kicker and Chipper  Module 

 

Support for  implementation of  Dribbler Module 

 

 

Fig 2.1 BeagleBone and its peripheral circuitry 

 
All  of  the  algorithms  of  the  robot’s  modules  like  motor  control,  wireless 
communication, kicker and dribbler modules have been successfully implemented on 
this board.  
 

2.2 Motor Control Circuitry

 

 
For our design, Maxon EC 45 Brushless DC motors were selected as wheel motor and 
Maxon  EC  16  as  dribbler  motor,  whereas  L6235  is  used  to  drive  these  motors.  The 
L6235  IC  includes  all  the  circuitry  needed  to  drive  a  three-phase  BLDC  motor 
including a three-phase DMOS Bridge, a constant off time  PWM Current Controller 
and  the  decoding  logic  for  single  ended  hall  sensors  that  generates  the  required 
sequence for the power stage. 

 

pdftohtml_folder/2013_TDP_EMEnents-html.html
background image

 
Feedback control is also implemented using US Digital E4P optical encoders attached 
separately  with  each  wheel  motor  with  a  custom  made  back-extended  shaft.  Each 
module  takes  3  inputs  for  each  motor;  PWM,  Direction  and  Brake.  Each  robot 
contains  a  total  of  five  L6235  modules,  four  for  the  wheel  motors  and  one  for  the 
dribbler motor.  

 

 

Fig 2.2(a) Dribbler module with Maxon EC-16 BLDC motor 

and silicone coated rod. 

 

Pulses  generated  by  the  encoders  are  fed  to  Beaglebone  which  helps  in  determining 
the speed of the  motor. As per setpoint, PID loop is implemented by Beaglebone by 
providing  required  output  PWM  to  L6235.  Data  received  wirelessly  will  determine 
the  speed  and  direction of  each  motor  as  required  by  movement  of  robot.  Fig  2.2(b) 
shows the 3D model of L6235 based circuitry implemented for motor control.

 

 
 
 

 

 

Fig 2.2(b)  3D model of L6235 circuitry implemented for motor control 

            

 

 

2.3   Wireless Communication 

 

pdftohtml_folder/2013_TDP_EMEnents-html.html
background image

For wireless communication between the robots and the AI server, Zigbee (802.15.4) 
based XBee Series 2 modules have been used due to their efficiency and ease of use. 
These  modules  are  3.3V  logic  devices.  Since  BeagleBone  is  also  a  3.3V  device  so 
interfacing both the modules becomes very easy. The modules are configured  in API 
mode  in  a  point-to-multipoint  topology  in  order  to  transmit  and  receive  an  entire 
frame  of  data.  This  frame  consists  of  fields  containing  the  information  regarding 
motion  control,  kicking  system,  dribbling  system.  The  format  of  the  data  packet  is 
shown in Fig 2.3 

  

Fig.2.3   Packet format for communication from AI Server to the Robot 

 

Currently we are employing one way transmission from the AI server to the robot, but 
we also plan to send the status of robot battery and control parameters from robot to 
AI server for features such as online debugging in future. 
 

 

2.4     Ball Shooting Mechanism

 

 

For  our  kicking  system,  we  are  using  solenoid  based  kicking  carried  out  using  a 
custom built solenoid. Two 2200 uF capacitors are charged to 200V by a boost circuit. 
Our  robots  have  two  kicking  mechanisms,  namely  flat  kick  and  the  chip  kick.  The 
solenoid  used  for  flat  kicking  has  700  turns  of  AWG  25  wire,  while  the  chip  kicker 
has 350 turns of AWG 25 wire. The kicker system is capable of delivering ball speeds 
as high as 10m/s, which is then limited to 8m/s in software as per the F180 rules. The 
kicking speeds are controlled by changing the on-time of IGBTs in the software. 
 

 

Fig.2.4 (a)   Top view of the kicker module showing the solenoid gun 

 

 

 

 
 

Data points based on on-time of the IGBTs and the output ball speed were collected 
and a function based on on-time in milliseconds vs the output ball speed at 200V was 

pdftohtml_folder/2013_TDP_EMEnents-html.html
background image

formulated.  This  function  was  then  employed  in  the  practical  implementation  of  the 
kicker circuit and was used to calculate the desired ball speed

.

 This function currently 

calculates values considering the assumption that the capacitors are charged at 200V. 
The graph showing our ball kicking speed vs. the on-time of power IGBT for 200V

 

is 

shown in Fig 2.4(c).

 

 

 

Fig 2.4(c) Graph showing on-time vs ball speeds 

 

 

We employed acoustic measurement techniques for determining the kicking speed of 
kicker  while  development.  Fig  2.4(d)  shows  our  recording  software  in  which  we 
recorded two sound peaks, first when the kicker touches the ball and second when the 
ball  hits  the  target  present  at  known  position.  By  measuring  the  time  between  these 
two peaks and using simple kinematic equations of motion, we were able to calculate 
the  ball  velocity  with  very  high  accuracy.  This  data  can  easily  help  us  for  accurate 
passing between different players. 

 

 

Fig 2.4 (d) Acoustic measurement of ball speed 

 

 

3  Mechanical Design

 

pdftohtml_folder/2013_TDP_EMEnents-html.html