background image

RoboDragons 2009 Extended Team Description

Hiroki Achiwa, Junya Maeno, Junya Tamaki, Saori Suzuki,

Tatsuya Moribayasi, Kazuhito Murakami and Tadashi Naruse

Aichi Prefectural University, Nagakute-cho, Aichi, 480-1198 JAPAN

1

Introduction

The RoboDragons team of Aichi Prefectural University has been doing its ac-
tivity for 11 years this year. At first, the team started as a joint team with
Chubu University in 1999. The name of the team at the time was Owaribito. In
2002, however, we newly started our team as the team consisting of people of
Aichi Prefectural University

1

and our team was renamed RoboDragons. In 2004

and 2005, we made a joint team with Carnegie-Mellon University to brush up
the robot system. The name of the team was CMRoboDragons. Meanwhile, we
won the 1st place 4 times in the Japan open and won, in the RoboCup World
Competition, the 3rd place in 2007 and the 4th place in 2004 and 2005.

Our current robots are the fourth generation ones in our Labs and the soccer

software is an improved one which was originally developed by CMU during
2004 and 2005 when we had the joint team. Many technical elements of the
robots are introduced the technology developed by the strong teams such as
Cornell University, Free University of Berlin, Carnegie-Mellon University and so
on, however, the solenoid driving circuit which realizes the powerful kicking is our
original one. The soccer software is improved for our purpose by implementing
the various strategies and the cooperative play skills such as 1-2-3 shoot.

In this paper, we describe the RoboDragons system in detail.

2

RoboDragons Team Members

The members and their roles of RoboDragons 2009 are as follows,

Junya Maeno(Strategy and Tactics, Team Leader)

Hiroki Achiwa(Vision and Mechanics)

Junya Tamaki(System Design)

Saori Suzuki(Tactics)

Tatsuya Moribayashi(Vision)

Kazuhito Murakami(Supervisor)

Tadashi Naruse(Supervisor)

1

The reason is that students of both universities had grown up to be able to develop
their robot system theirselves in each university.

pdftohtml_folder/2009_ETDP_RoboDragons-html.html
background image

3

RoboDragons system overview

In this section, we give an overview of the RoboDragons system.

RoboDragons system consists of 5 robots, a host computer, cameras, a video

capture board and a communication device(modem). Table 1 shows the summary
of the system.

Table 1.

RoboDragons system overview

Robots

Products of SMATS Inc.

Host Computer

CPU

Athlon64 X2 4200+

Memory

512MB

OS

Debian GNU/Linux

Language

C++

Compiler

gcc version3.3

Cameras

Body

Panasonic DVR-310

Lens

RAYNOX HD-5050PRO

Video Capture Board Philips SAA7133 based
Modem

Futaba FRH-SD03T

Figure 1 shows an outward of the robot with and without the robot cover.

Each robot has 4 omni-wheels each of which is driven by a DC motor with an
encoder, kicking devices which realize a straight kick and a chip-kick, a dribbling
device, and computer boards that controls the robot. Detailed description of the
robot is given in the next section.

Fig. 1.

Robots

pdftohtml_folder/2009_ETDP_RoboDragons-html.html
background image

The robot control program for the RoboCup soccer is developed by using the

C++ programming language under the Debian GNU/Linux. The basic program
was developed when we had jointed with CMU in 2004 and 2005. After the joint
team was over, we have been improving the program ourselves. However, the
basic framework of the program have not been changing since 2005, namely the
modules of the program are an rserver, a soccer, a view and a vlog, as shown
in the dotted line of figure 2. The rsever has a vision and a radio submodule.
The soccer and view modules have a common world submodule which contains
a tracker submodule. The role of each module or submodule is as follows,

rserver

The rserver takes an interface with other modules and the outer world,

i.e. controls the whole system.

soccer

The soccer decides the action of each robot under the given strategy.

view

The view is a GUI module. It communicates with an operator. It also

initializes the system state at starting time.

vlog

The vlog logs various data such as robot position, velocity, which are nec-

essary for the analysis after the competition.

vision

The vision processes the captured images and detects the position of

robots and a ball.

radio

The radio makes a robot command packet and sends it to the robots

through the radio device.

world

The world computes the velocity of each robot and a ball and manages

the history of the movement of each robot.

tracker

The tracker is a submodule of the world module and predicts the posi-

tions of robots and a ball at 5 frames ahead by using the history.

The modules are invoked as processes and the communication between modules
is performed by the UDP communication.

Fig. 2.

Configuration of the RoboCup soccer program

pdftohtml_folder/2009_ETDP_RoboDragons-html.html
background image

4

Robots

In this section, we discuss our robots in detail.

4.1

Robot hardware

Dimensions of robot

The robot can be packed in the cylinder with dimensions

of 145

mm

height and 178

mm

diameter. To protect the internal circuit boards

and mechanical devices, the robot is covered by the cardboard shown in figure
3. To reinforce the cardboard, the plastic sheet with 1.5

mm

thickness is glued

on the cardboard.

Drive unit

The robot has 4 wheels each of which is drived by a DC motor.

The wheel is so called an omni-wheel. Figure 4 shows the omni-wheels attached
to the robot.

The DC motor driving the omni-wheel is Maxon’s “RE-max 24” with encoder

unit. The source voltage of the motor is 15

V

. The motor also has a pinion gear

with 12 teeth and the omni-wheel has a gear with 95 teeth so that the reduction
ratio is 1 : 7.92. The diameter of the omni-wheel is 60 mm and the omni-wheel
has 15 small tires in circumference. The diameter of the small tire is 13

mm

.

Fig. 3.

Robot cover

Fig. 4.

Omni wheel

Kicking device

The kicking device consists of solenoids, kick bars, and a volt-

age booster.

Solenoids: Three solenoids are built in the robot, one is for a main kicker

and two are for a chip kicker. These (coils only) are shown in figure 5 and figure
6 shows the solenoids built in a chassis. In Fig. 6, the solenoid at the center is
used for the straight kicking (main kicker) and the two small solenoids are used
for the chip kicking.

pdftohtml_folder/2009_ETDP_RoboDragons-html.html
background image

Fig. 5.

Solenoids

Fig. 6.

Chassis

The coil of the large solenoid is made winding the 0.7

mm

φ

enamelled wire

on a polyacetal (POM) cylinder in 8 layers. The dimensions of the cylinder are
13

mm

in inner diameter, 26

mm

in outer diameter and 55

mm

in length. The

stroke of the solenoid is 30

mm

and enables the kicking a ball with speed of 9.5

msec

under the ideal conditions.

Two small solenoids are connected in series to make a chip kicker. The coil

of the small solenoid is made using the same material with the large one. The
dimension of the cylinder is 13

mm

, 26

mm

and 27

mm

, respectively. The stroke

is 7

mm

and it can kick the ball with flying distance of 2

m

and flying height of

1

m

.

Each solenoid uses the spring to pull back the plunger.

Kick bar: Figure 7 shows the kick bar. 7075 aluminum alloy which is light and

hard is employed for the kick bar. Moreover, V-shaped ABS plastic is attached
to the aluminum kick bar as shown in figure 8. This helps to kick the ball to the
direction perpendicular to the kick bar within the accuracy of 5 degree.

Fig. 7.

Kicking device

Fig. 8.

Attachment of V-shaped plastic

pdftohtml_folder/2009_ETDP_RoboDragons-html.html
background image

Voltage booster: The voltage booster is a kind of DC-DC converter. It con-

verts 15

V

DC input voltage up to 250

V

DC output voltage. Output voltage

is adjustable between 150

V

and 250

V

. A booster circuit is shown in figure

9. The chopper circuit using a choke coil is a heart of the voltage booster. A
PIC controls the chopper circuit. Large capacity condensers are used for keeping
the high voltage output. Total capacity is 4500

µF

. The voltage sensing circuit

controls the output voltage. 2 solid state relays are used as the switches to drive
the solenoids. These relays are controlled exclusively by the PIC. The charging
time of the condensers is about 2

sec

when the output voltage is 200

V

.

The voltage booster is shown in figure 10

external

Control

command

Chopper

15V

Control

(PIC)

Voltage

Sensor

to main 

solenoid

4500 uF

to sub-

solenoid

Fig. 9.

Voltage boost circuit

Fig. 10.

Voltage booster

pdftohtml_folder/2009_ETDP_RoboDragons-html.html
background image

Dribbling device

A dribbling device of the robot has been achieved by com-

bining the dribble roller, the motor and the gear. Figure 11 shows the dribbling
device.

The dribbling device uses a Maxon’s “RE-max 21” motor with an encoder

and a planetary gear. The reduction ratio of the gear is 1 : 3.8. A pinion gear
attached to the motor has 30 teeth and a gear attached to the dribble roller has
24 teeth. Therefore, the net reduction ratio

R

is given by,

R

=

R

m

×

R

g

= 3

.

8

×

24

30

= 3

.

04

,

(1)

where,

R

m

is the reduction ratio of the planetary gear and

R

g

is the reduction

ratio of the pinion gear and the gear on the dribble roller.

The dimensions of the dribble roller are 20mm in diameter and 73mm in

length. The material of the dribble roller is a alminum shaft with silicon rubber
of 4mm thickness on the face of the shaft.

Fig. 11.

Dribble device

Communication unit

Our wireless communication is a spectrum diffusion

communication on the 2.4 GHz band. Futaba’s wireless modem “FRH-SD07T”
is used for the purpose. It is shown in figure 12. The modem has several commu-
nication modes. We use a “direct mode” which can send the messages the least
delay among the various communication modes. A pair of the FRH-SD03T and
the FRH-SD07T realizes the communication between the host computer and the
robot(s).

Proximity sensor unit

The proximity sensor is attached above the dribbling

device and it detects the ball just in front of the dribbling device. Figure 13 shows
the proximity sensor viewing from upper side and lower side. Also, see Fig. 3

pdftohtml_folder/2009_ETDP_RoboDragons-html.html